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3,204 Views 3 Replies Last post: Feb 23, 2009 7:40 AM by peaceCENTER RSS
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Oct 23, 2008
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Feb 22, 2009 9:01 PM

a plethora of questions (fonts, formatting, pages)

I've been reading through a lot of these posts, and as helpful (and confusing) some of them are, I still have some questions.

 

1. What's the preferred, or generally agreed upon font type that works best in fiction literature (say size 5'x8' ish)? I know that it's ultimately by author preference, but what seems to work best in the end? I normally write things using Ariel font, but I've been reading that TrueType fonts are better. Is there a difference between Open and True?

 

2. My potential novel is around 180 pages in word (margins sized 5x8 again) so... technically, it's only around  90 total pages (front and back). Does CreateSpace take that into account when it considers page numbers? Since the pages will be printed back and front.

 

3. Title page formatting: where does the CreateSpace info go (like isbn # and stuff), and will it just be printed onto a formatted title page? Or should you leave a blank page for the information somewhere? If so, where? I plan on formatting all the pages (title, dedication, etc) in MS word before converting it to PDF.

 

4. I can't remember what I was going to ask.

 

Sorry for asking so many questions, but I'm new and I just don't want to screw up anything too badly if I can avoid it. :] thanks in advance!

Level 5 3,330 posts since
Sep 17, 2008
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2. Feb 22, 2009 10:37 PM in response to: roxie
Re: a plethora of questions (fonts, formatting, pages)

Hi roxie,

 

Welcome to the CS community.

 

Yep - you have a few questions . . . but that's good. I'll attempt to answer some of them. 

 

Title page formatting: where does the CreateSpace info go (like isbn # and stuff), and will it just be printed onto a formatted title page? Or should you leave a blank page for the information somewhere? If so, where? I plan on formatting all the pages (title, dedication, etc) in MS word before converting it to PDF.

 

1. Createspace will not create your copyright page. You will need to do this prior to creating your pdf.

 

If you do not have your own ISBN#, you'll need to use the ISBN# that's provided by CS. In your intial setup, CS will provide your ISBN# if you do not provide your own. When you get that number you simply update your original draft to include that ISBN# as well as other info you'd like to put on the copyright page before you convert it to the pdf format.

 

The copyright page is usually the next page after the title page.

 

I've noticed that in some books, the text is justified (as in both edges are straight down) and some are left-aligned. What do you think is best?

 

2. You will find that some books justify and others do not. What I usually do is format my book so that it is similar to what other books in it's category look like. That's the most simple way to do it. But it's pretty much up to you.

 

My potential novel is around 180 pages in word (margins sized 5x8 again) so... technically, it's only around 90 total pages (front and back). Does CreateSpace take that into account when it considers page numbers? Since the pages will be printed back and front.

 

3. When you convert your word document to a pdf, it'll be 180 pages. Pages are counted front and back as they are in your document. So there is nothing CS needs to take into account.

 

Hopefully some of these answers will help you. I'm sure other CS members will provide additional information to your other questions.

 

Please continue to use this forum if you have further questions or concerns or if you'd simply wish to share your thoughts. We are all here to help each other out! 

 

"This is an interactive forum, so if you've found our answers to be useful, feel free to click on your choice of stars that lets us know if our answers were 'correct' or 'useful' in your opinion. Thx!" - Eric V. Van Der Hope

 

Eric V. Van Der Hope | Publisher & Author of -

Mastering Niche Marketing: A Definitive Guide to Profiting From Ideas in a Competitive Market

Website: http://www.MasteringNicheMarketing.com

Level 4 1,317 posts since
Aug 11, 2007
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3. Feb 23, 2009 7:40 AM in response to: roxie
Re: a plethora of questions (fonts, formatting, pages)

It looks like some of your formatting questions have been answered well, so let's talk about layout:

 

Fonts: you are asking two different questions here. TrueType is a technical way that the font is formed (think of it, to put is very simply, as the underlying software algorhithm that forms the font.). You could have, say, and Arial font as TrueType, Postscript  or ClearType fonts will work fine with this printing process. Microsoft (and others) have developed some other types of fonts (ie ClearTpye) that are especially easy to read on the screen, but this is not an issue for you. OpenType is the successor to both TrueType and Postscript: if you have it, well and good, but you are not going to notice any difference in the end product (although it does work better, I am told, in non-Roman alphabets . .  if you are writing in Greek, Hebrew or Arqbic it might make a difference.)

 

Arial is a font FACE, or a style of font. Arial is a sans-serif font, which means it does not have the little serifs (like the foot on the bottom of a "T" in Times New Roman, a serif font) Usability studies have shown that sans-serif fonts ar about 20% harder to read than serif fonts. Arial also has a somewhat "industrial," cold look. It is generally not used in fiction. A lot depends on what kind of book you have written. I could see Arial or another sans-serif typeface like Arial or Verdana being used for, say, science fiction, but not for romance. The feel of the font would conflict with the tone of the writing. You might want to explore Georgia or Goudy Old Style.

 

As to justification, justified text is also a little harder to read than ragged-right text, as there are fewer clues to line endings for the reader. However, this is more a matter of personal preference for you. Looking through my bookshelf, all of the novels seem to be right-justified. You might want to go to the library or a bookstore, look at some book similar to your genre, and see what they do. This is what readers are familiar with and will be the least "jarring," even if they don't know why.

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